Healthy Happy 100 References
INTRODUCTION 
  1. https://www.telegraph.co.uk/science/2017/07/17/life-expectancy-stalls-britain-first-time-100-years-dementia/

 

2. Lesser et al. (2007). Relationship between Funding Source and Conclusion among Nutrition-Related Scientific Articles. https://journals.plos.org/plosmedicine/article?id=10.1371/journal.pmed.0040005#s3

 

3. Yerushalmy, Y. and Hilleboe, H. E. (1957). ‘Fat in the Diet and Mortality from Heart Disease: A Methodologic Note.’ https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/13441073

 

4. Kearns et al. (2017). Sugar Industry and Coronary Heart Disease Research. www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5099084/

 

5. Herskind et al. (1996). The heritability of human longevity: a population-based study of 2872 Danish twin pairs born 1870-1900. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8786073

UNDERSTANDING FOOD

1. Chang CY et. al. (2009). Essential fatty acids and the human brain. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20329590

 

2. Zhang QQ (2015). “Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Dyslipidemia, Risk for Cardiovascular Complications, and Treatment Strategy.” https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26357637

 

3. Hirata Y et. Al (2017). “Trans-Fatty acids promote proinflammatory signaling and cell death by stimulating the apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1)-p38 pathway.” https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28360100

 

4. Restrepo BJ. et.al. (2016). Denmark’s Policy on Artificial Trans Fat and Cardiovascular Disease. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26319518

 

5. Carmichael, Duncan. (2018). Younger for Longer: How You Can Slow the Ageing Process and Stay Healthy for Life. London: Little Brown Book Group.

 

6. European Commission. Trans fat in food. https://ec.europa.eu/food/safety/labelling_nutrition/trans-fat-food_en

 

7. Jacqueline K Innes et al. (2018). Omega-6 Fatty Acids and Inflammation. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/29610056/

 

8. Simopoulos AP. (2008). The importance of the omega-6/omega-3 fatty acid ratio in cardiovascular disease and other chronic diseases. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18408140

 

9. Thesing CS et al. (2018). Omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acid levels in depressive and anxiety disorders. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29040890

 

10. Jianling Xie et al. (2019). Regulation of the Elongation Phase of Protein Synthesis Enhances Translation Accuracy and Modulates Lifespan. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30773367

 

11. Ioannis Delimaris. (2013) Adverse Effects Associated with Protein Intake above the Recommended Dietary Allowance for Adults. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4045293/

 

12. Levine ME et al. (2014). Low protein intake is associated with a major reduction in IGF-1, cancer, and overall mortality in the 65 and younger but not older population. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24606898

 

13. Nutr Res Rev et al. (2014). Misconceptions about fructose-containing sugars and their role in the obesity epidemic. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24666553

 

14. Alan W Barclay. (2008). Glycemic index, glycemic load, and chronic disease risk—a meta-analysis of observational studies. https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article/87/3/627/4633329

 

15. Roger J. Mullins. (2017). Insulin Resistance as a Link between Amyloid-Beta and Tau Pathologies in Alzheimer’s Disease. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5413582/

 

16. Mail online: https://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-8040003/Better-Health-Victoria-reveals-glasses-water-REALLY-need-day.html

 

17. Naila A. Shaheen. (2018). Public knowledge of dehydration and fluid intake practices: variation by participants’ characteristics. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6282244/

 

18. Ronald J Maughan et al. (2016). A randomized trial to assess the potential of different beverages to affect hydration status: development of a beverage hydration index. https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article/103/3/717/4564598#110158719

 

19. Sophie C. Killer et al. (2014). No Evidence of Dehydration with Moderate Daily Coffee Intake: A Counterbalanced Cross-Over Study in a Free-Living Population. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3886980/

 

20. Adrian Burton. (2008). Cardiovascular Health: Hard Data for Hard Water. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2265038/

 

21. Khalil Mahmoodi et al. (2014). The Efficacy of Hydration with Normal Saline Versus Hydration with Sodium Bicarbonate in the Prevention of Contrast-induced. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4124663/

 

22. Andrew Mente. (2018). Urinary sodium excretion, blood pressure, cardiovascular disease, and mortality: a community-level prospective epidemiological cohort study. https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(18)31376-X/fulltext

 

23. Garg R. (2011). Low-salt diet increases insulin resistance in healthy subjects. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21036373

 

24. O'Donnell MJ. (2011). Urinary sodium and potassium excretion and risk of cardiovascular events. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22110105

 

25. Jürgens G. (2003). Effects of low sodium diet versus high sodium diet on blood pressure, renin, aldosterone, catecholamines, cholesterols, and triglyceride. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12535503

 

26. Rebecca A Lipasek. (2011). Effects of Anticaking Agents and Relative Humidity on the Physical and Chemical Stability of Powdered Vitamin C. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/22417544/

 

27. Holland TM et al. (2020). Dietary flavonols and risk of Alzheimer dementia. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31996451

 

28. Haneen Amawi et al. (2017). Polyphenolic Nutrients in Cancer Chemoprevention and Metastasis: Role of the Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal (EMT) Pathway. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5579704/

 

29. Tarique Hussain. (2016). Oxidative Stress and Inflammation: What Polyphenols Can Do for Us? https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5055983/

 

30. Fresco P. (2010). The anticancer properties of dietary polyphenols and its relation with apoptosis. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20214622/

 

31. Telma Corrêa et al. (2019). The Two-Way Polyphenols-Microbiota Interactions and Their Effects on Obesity and Related Metabolic Diseases. https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fnut.2019.00188/full

 

32. Cristina Fortes. (2017) Mediterranean diet: fresh herbs and fresh vegetables decrease the risk of Androgenetic Alopecia in males. https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00403-017-1799-z

 

33. Krikorian R. (2010). Concord grape juice supplementation improves memory function in older adults with mild cognitive impairment. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20028599/

 

34. Field DT. (2011). Consumption of cocoa flavanols results in an acute improvement in visual and cognitive functions. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21324330/

 

35. Mennen LI. (2005). Risks and safety of polyphenol consumption. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15640498

 

36. Anya Topiwala et al. (2017). Moderate alcohol consumption as risk factor for adverse brain outcomes and cognitive decline: longitudinal cohort study.  https://www.bmj.com/content/357/bmj.j2353

 

37. Séverine Sabia et al. (2017). Alcohol consumption and risk of dementia: 23 year follow-up of Whitehall II cohort study. https://www.bmj.com/content/362/bmj.k2927

 

38. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Centenarian#Centenarian_populations_by_country

 

39. https://www.bbc.com/future/article/20190116-a-high-carb-diet-may-explain-why-okinawans-live-so-long

SUPERFOOD AND DRINK 

 

1. Shilpa N. Bhupathiraju. (2014). Changes in coffee intake and subsequent risk of type 2 diabetes: three large cohorts of US men and women. https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00125-014-3235-7

 

2. FRANCESCA BRAVI, et al. (2013). Coffee Reduces Risk for Hepatocellular Carcinoma: An Updated Meta-analysis. https://www.cghjournal.org/article/S1542-3565(13)00609-5/pdf

 

3. David G. Munoz. (2018). Caffeine and Parkinson disease. https://n.neurology.org/content/90/5/205

 

4. Elizabeth Mostofsky. (2012). Habitual Coffee Consumption and Risk of Heart Failure. https://www.ahajournals.org/doi/full/10.1161/CIRCHEARTFAILURE.112.967299

 

5. Robin Poole et al. (2017). Coffee consumption and health: umbrella review of meta-analyses of multiple health outcomes. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5696634/

 

6. Yin-Pan Chau, et al. (2019). Serum Metabolome of Coffee Consumption and its Association With Bone Mineral Density: The Hong Kong Osteoporosis Study. https://academic.oup.com/jcem/advance-article-abstract/doi/10.1210/clinem/dgz210/5637088?redirectedFrom=fulltext

 

7. Acheson KJ. et al. (2004). Metabolic effects of caffeine in humans: lipid oxidation or futile cycling? https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14684395

 

8. Parras et al. (2006). Antioxidant capacity of coffees of several origins brewed following three different procedures. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0308814606004304

 

9. Robin Poole et al. (2017). Coffee consumption and health: umbrella review of meta-analyses of multiple health outcomes. https://www.bmj.com/content/359/bmj.j5024

 

10. Zhou A. et al. (2019). Long-term coffee consumption, caffeine metabolism genetics, and risk of cardiovascular disease: a prospective analysis of up to 347,077 individuals and 8368 cases. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30838377

 

11. (2019). Too much caffeine during pregnancy may damage baby's liver. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/07/190724155937.htm

 

12. Carmichael, Duncan. (2018). Younger for Longer: How You Can Slow the Ageing Process and Stay Healthy for Life. London: Little Brown Book Group.

 

13. Zafar Rasheed. (2019). Molecular evidences of health benefits of drinking black tea. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6512146/

 

14. Junhua Li. (2019). Habitual tea drinking modulates brain efficiency: evidence from brain connectivity. https://www.aging-us.com/article/102023/text

 

15. Maria Pfeuffer. (2007). Addition of milk prevents vascular protective effects of tea. https://academic.oup.com/eurheartj/article/28/10/1265/2887449

 

16. Yasar Kemal Erdem. (2017). Interactions between milk proteins and polyphenols: Binding mechanisms, related changes, and the future trends in the dairy industry. https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/87559129.2017.1377225

 

17. Xinyan Wang. (2020). Tea consumption and the risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality: The China-PAR project. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/2047487319894685

 

18. Singhal et al. (2017). Probable benefits of green tea with genetic implications. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5406788/

 

19. Vijay S. Thakur. (2012). Green tea polyphenols causes cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in prostate cancer cells by suppressing class I histone deacetylases. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3499108/

 

20. Gillespie K. (2008). Effects of oral consumption of the green tea polyphenol EGCG in a murine model for human Sjogren's syndrome, an autoimmune disease. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18809413

 

21. Qi Zhang et al. (2016). https://www.researchgate.net/publication/305647840_Virucidal_capacity_of_novel_protecTeaV_sanitizer_formulations_containing_lipophilic_rpigallocatechin-3-Gallate_EGCG

 

22. https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2018/feb/20/meat-food-safety-trading-standards

 

23. https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2018/may/31/beef-production-britain-farming

 

24. Lehnen et al. (2015). A review on effects of conjugated linoleic fatty acid (CLA) upon body composition and energetic metabolism. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4574006/

 

25. Kanter et al. (2018). Conjugated Linoleic Acid-Driven Weight Loss Is Protective against Atherosclerosis in Mice and Is Associated with Alternative Macrophage Enrichment in Perivascular Adipose Tissue. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6213611/

 

26. Daley et al. (2010). A review of fatty acid profiles and antioxidant content in grass-fed and grain-fed beef. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2846864/

 

27. Kühn et al. (2014). Free-range farming: a natural alternative to produce vitamin D-enriched eggs. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24607306

 

28. Karsten et al. (2010). https://www.researchgate.net/publication/44140929_Vitamins_A_E_and_fatty_acid_composition_of_the_eggs_of_caged_hens_and_pastured_hens

 

29. https://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/chicken-supermarket-offers-industrial-farming-price-asda-aldi-lidl-tesco-sainsbury-morrisons-a8758861.html

 

30. Secci et al. (2015). From farm to fork: lipid oxidation in fish products. A review. https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/1828051X.2015.1128687

 

31. Fry et al. (2016). Environmental health impacts of feeding crops to farmed fish. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0160412016300587

 

32. Blasa et al. (2006). Raw Millefiori honey is packed full of antioxidants. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0308814605003262

 

33. Pahwa et al. (2020). Chronic Inflammation. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK493173/

 

34. Samarghandian et al. (2017). Honey and Health: A Review of Recent Clinical Research. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5424551/

 

35. Alam et al. (2104) Honey: A Potential Therapeutic Agent for Managing Diabetic Wounds. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4216698/

 

36. Fingleton et al. (2014). A randomised controlled trial of topical Kanuka honey for the treatment of psoriasis. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4012670/

 

37. Abdulrhman et al. (2013). Metabolic effects of honey in type 1 diabetes mellitus: a randomized crossover pilot study. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23256446

 

38. Erejuwa et al. (2011). Differential responses to blood pressure and oxidative stress in streptozotocin-induced diabetic Wistar-Kyoto rats and spontaneously hypertensive rats: effects of antioxidant (honey) treatment. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21673929

 

39. Yaghoobi et al. (2008). Natural honey and cardiovascular risk factors; effects on blood glucose, cholesterol, triacylglycerole, CRP, and body weight compared with sucrose. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18454257

 

40. Shadkam et al. (2010). A comparison of the effect of honey, dextromethorphan, and diphenhydramine on nightly cough and sleep quality in children and their parents. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20618098

 

50. Alcorn et al. (2019). Honey to Improve Sleep Quality: a Feasibility Study. https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT03567395

 

51. Rostami et al. (2015). High-cocoa polyphenol-rich chocolate improves blood pressure in patients with diabetes and hypertension. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4460349/

 

52. Souza et al. (2017). Effect of chocolate and mate tea on the lipid profile of individuals with HIV/AIDS on antiretroviral therapy: A clinical trial. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0899900717301284

 

53. Jafarirad et al. (2018). Dark Chocolate Effect on Serum Adiponectin, Biochemical and Inflammatory Parameters in Diabetic Patients: A Randomized Clinical Trial. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6202779/

 

54. Berk et al. (2018). Dark chocolate (70% cacao) effects human gene expression: Cacao regulates cellular immune response, neural signaling, and sensory perception. https://www.fasebj.org/doi/10.1096/fasebj.2018.32.1_supplement.755.1

 

55. Crichton et al. (2016). Chocolate intake is associated with better cognitive function: The Maine-Syracuse Longitudinal Study. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0195666316300459

 

56. Katagiri et al. (2020). Association of soy and fermented soy product intake with total and cause specific mortality: prospective cohort study. https://www.bmj.com/content/368/bmj.m34

 

57. Xu et al. (2019). An insight into the health benefits of fermented soy products. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30236688

 

58. O’Shea et al. (2004). Immunomodulatory properties of conjugated linoleic acid. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15159257

 

59. Hartigh et al. (2019). Conjugated Linoleic Acid Effects on Cancer, Obesity, and Atherosclerosis: A Review of Pre-Clinical and Human Trials with Current Perspectives. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30754681

 

60. Huebner et al. (2010). Individual isomers of conjugated linoleic acid reduce inflammation associated with established collagen-induced arthritis in DBA/1 mice. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20573944

 

61. Park et al. (2013). Conjugated linoleic acid and calcium co-supplementation improves bone health in ovariectomised mice. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23578644

 

62. Dhiman et al. (1999). Conjugated linoleic acid content of milk from cows fed different diets. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10531600/

 

63. Faulkner et al. (2018). Effect of different forage types on the volatile and sensory properties of bovine milk. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29224876

 

64. Hebeisen et al. (1993). Increased concentrations of omega-3 fatty acids in milk and platelet rich plasma of grass-fed cows. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7905466

 

65. Wang et al. (2014). Biological properties of 6-gingerol: a brief review. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25230520

 

66. Alizadeh-Navaei et al. (2008). Investigation of the effect of ginger on the lipid levels. A double blind controlled clinical trial. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18813412

 

67. Khandouzi et al. (2015). The Effects of Ginger on Fasting Blood Sugar, Hemoglobin A1c, Apolipoprotein B, Apolipoprotein A-I and Malondialdehyde in Type 2 Diabetic Patients. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4277626/

 

68. Altman et al. (2001). Effects of a ginger extract on knee pain in patients with osteoarthritis. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11710709

 

69. Saenghong et al. (2011). Zingiber officinale Improves Cognitive Function of the Middle-Aged Healthy Women. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3253463/

 

70. Ernts (2000). Efficacy of ginger for nausea and vomiting: a systematic review of randomized clinical trials. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/10793599/

 

71. Hasani et al. (2019). Does ginger supplementation lower blood pressure? A systematic review and meta-analysis of clinical trials. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30972845

 

72. Kor et al. (2014). http://www.imedpub.com/articles/physiological-and-pharmaceutical-effects-of-ginger-zingiber-officinale-roscoeas-a-valuable-medicinal-plant.pdf

 

73. Mashhadi et al. (2013). Anti-Oxidative and Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Ginger in Health and Physical Activity: Review of Current Evidence. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3665023/

SCARY FOOD & DRINK

1. Afshin et al. (2019). Health effects of dietary risks in 195 countries, 1990–2017: a systematic analysis. http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(19)30041-8/fulltext

 

2. DiFeliceantonio et al. (2018). Supra-Additive Effects of Combining Fat and Carbohydrate on Food Reward. https://www.cell.com/cell-metabolism/fulltext/S1550-4131(18)30325-5#secsectitle0020

 

3. Tuulari et al. (2017). Feeding Releases Endogenous Opioids in Humans. https://www.jneurosci.org/content/37/34/8284

 

4. Stevenson et al. (2020). Hippocampal-dependent appetitive control is impaired by experimental exposure to a Western-style diet. https://royalsocietypublishing.org/doi/10.1098/rsos.191338

5. (2019). Researchers warn: junk food could be responsible for the food allergy epidemic. https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2019-06/sh-rwj053019.php

 

6. Takeuchi et al. (2004). Involvement of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) in Alzheimer's disease. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15975084

 

7. Nassan et al. (2020). Association of Dietary Patterns with Testicular Function in Young Danish Men. https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamanetworkopen/fullarticle/2761546

 

8. Grippo et al. (2020). Dopamine Signaling in the Suprachiasmatic Nucleus Enables Weight Gain Associated with Hedonic Feeding. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/32259494

 

9. Banta et al. (2019). Mental health status and dietary intake among California adults: a population-based survey. https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/09637486.2019.1570085

 

10. Mrug et al. (2019). Sodium and potassium excretion predict increased depression in urban adolescents. https://physoc.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.14814/phy2.14213

 

11. Srour et al. (2019). Ultra-processed food intake and risk of cardiovascular disease: prospective cohort study. https://www.bmj.com/content/365/bmj.l1451

 

12. Schernhammer et al. (2012). Consumption of artificial sweetener– and sugar-containing soda and risk of lymphoma and leukemia in men and women. https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article/96/6/1419/4571485

 

13. Suez et al. (2014). Artificial sweeteners induce glucose intolerance by altering the gut microbiota. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25231862/

 

14. Brom et al. (2012). High fat diet-induced glucose intolerance impairs myocardial function, but not myocardial perfusion during hyperaemia: a pilot study. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3458910/

 

15. Lesser et al. (2007). Relationship between Funding Source and Conclusion among Nutrition-Related Scientific Articles. https://journals.plos.org/plosmedicine/article?id=10.1371/journal.pmed.0040005#s3

 

16. Ruiz-Ojeda et al. (2019). Effects of Sweeteners on the Gut Microbiota: A Review of Experimental Studies and Clinical Trials. https://academic.oup.com/advances/article/10/suppl_1/S31/5307224

 

17. Cock et al. (2016). Erythritol Is More Effective Than Xylitol and Sorbitol in Managing Oral Health Endpoints. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5011233/

 

18. Alsunni et al. (2015). Energy Drink Consumption: Beneficial and Adverse Health Effects. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4682602/

 

19. Shah et al. (2019). Impact of High Volume Energy Drink Consumption on Electrocardiographic and Blood Pressure Parameters: A Randomized Trial. https://www.ahajournals.org/doi/full/10.1161/JAHA.118.011318

 

20. Manchester et al. (2017). The Benefits and Risks of Energy Drinks in Young Adults and Military Service Members. https://academic.oup.com/milmed/article/182/7/e1726/4158565

 

21. Greene et al. (2014). Energy drink-induced acute kidney injury. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24986632

 

22. Park et al. (2016). Association between energy drink intake, sleep, stress, and suicidality in Korean adolescents. https://nutritionj.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12937-016-0204-7

 

23. Kaplan et al. (1997). Dose-dependent pharmacokinetics and psychomotor effects of caffeine in humans. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9378841

 

24. Grandner et al. (2014). Implications of sleep and energy drink use for health disparities. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4264529/

 

25. Khanna et al. (2019). Nutritional Aspects of Depression in Adolescents - A Systematic Review. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6484557/

 

26. https://www.soilassociation.org/organic-living/why-organic/better-for-animals/

 

27. https://www.telegraph.co.uk/global-health/science-and-disease/countries-still-using-antibiotics-fatten-animals-despite-ban/

 

28. Dutton et al. (2017). Antibiotic exposure and risk of weight gain and obesity: protocol for a systematic review. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5571496/

 

29. Harper et al. (2018). The Role of Bacteria, Probiotics and Diet in Irritable Bowel Syndrome. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5848117/

 

30. https://www.wired.com/story/farm-antibiotics-human-illness-hidden-link/

 

31. Liu et al. (2018). Escherichia coli ST131-H22 as a Foodborne Uropathogen. https://mbio.asm.org/content/9/4/e00470-18

 

32. Van Boeckel et al. (2019). Global trends in antimicrobial resistance in animals in low- and middle-income countries. https://science.sciencemag.org/content/365/6459/eaaw1944

 

33. Islam et al. (2019). Occurrence and Characterization of Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Processed Raw Foods and Ready-to-Eat Foods in an Urban Setting of a Developing Country. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6426745/

 

34. Agersø et al. (2012). Study of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in Danish pigs at slaughter and in imported retail meat reveals a novel MRSA type in slaughter pigs. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22245403

 

35. https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/eat-organic-meat-to-tackle-antibiotic-crisis-nh03wkxs8

 

36. Willett et al. (2020). Milk and Health. https://www.acc.org/latest-in-cardiology/ten-points-to-remember/2020/02/13/14/56/milk-and-health

 

37. Michaëlsson et al. (2014). Milk intake and risk of mortality and fractures in women and men: cohort studies. https://www.bmj.com/content/349/bmj.g6015

 

38. Lanou et al. (2009). Should dairy be recommended as part of a healthy vegetarian diet? Counterpoint. https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article/89/5/1638S/4596954

 

39. Fraser et al. (2020). Dairy, soy, and risk of breast cancer: those confounded milks. https://academic.oup.com/ije/advance-article-abstract/doi/10.1093/ije/dyaa007/5743492?redirectedFrom=fulltext

 

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84. Delange et al. (2000). Iodine supplementation: benefits outweigh risks. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10672891

 

85. Dietary Reference Intakes (DRIs): Recommended Dietary Allowances and Adequate Intakes, Vitamins. Food and Nutrition Board, Institute of Medicine, National Academies. https://www.nal.usda.gov/sites/default/files/fnic_uploads/RDA_AI_vitamins_elements.pdf

 

86. Mao et al. (2001). Electrolyte loss in sweat and iodine deficiency in a hot environment. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11480505

 

87. Sang et al. (2012). Exploration of the safe upper level of iodine intake in euthyroid Chinese adults: a randomized double-blind trial. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22205314

 

88. Ran et al. (2018). Extra Dose of Vitamin C Based on a DailySupplementation Shortens the Common Cold: A Meta-Analysis of 9 Randomized Controlled Trials. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6057395/

 

89. Leuven. (2020). Copper-based nanomaterials can kill cancer cells in mice. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2020/01/200109105513.htm

 

90. Tisato et al. (2010). Copper in diseases and treatments, and copper-based anticancer strategies. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19626597

 

91. Lee (2016). Copper supplementation amplifies the anti-tumor effect of curcumin in oral cancer cells. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27765374

 

92. Chen. et al. (2019). Association Among Dietary Supplement Use, Nutrient Intake, and Mortality Among U.S. Adults. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30959527

 

93. Kern. (2016). Calcium supplementation and risk of dementia in women with cerebrovascular disease. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5085079/

 

94. Kunutsor et al. (2017). Low serum magnesium levels are associated with increased risk of fractures. https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10654-017-0242-2

 

95. Rasouli-Ghahroudi et al. (2018). Vitamin K and Bone Metabolism: A Review of the Latest Evidence in Preclinical Studies. https://www.hindawi.com/journals/bmri/2018/4629383/

 

96. Bjelakovic et al. (2012). https://www.cochrane.org/CD007176/LIVER_antioxidant-supplements-for-prevention-of-mortality-in-healthy-participants-and-patients-with-various-diseases

 

97. Jansen et al. (2016). Tissue-Specific Effects of Vitamin E Supplementation. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4964537/

WEIGHT - LOSS

1. https://www.mintel.com/press-centre/food-and-drink/brits-lose-count-of-their-calories-over-a-third-of-brits-dont-know-how-many-calories-they-consume-on-a-typical-day

 

2. Mattson et al. (2005). Beneficial effects of intermittent fasting and caloric restriction on the cardiovascular and cerebrovascular systems. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S095528630400261X

 

3. https://www.nia.nih.gov/news/research-intermittent-fasting-shows-health-benefits

 

4. Cignarella et al. (2018). Intermittent Fasting Confers Protection in CNS Autoimmunity by Altering the Gut Microbiota. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29874567/

 

5. Alirezaei et al. (2010). Short-term fasting induces profound neuronal autophagy. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20534972

 

6. Wilkinson et al. (2020). Ten-Hour Time-Restricted Eating Reduces Weight, Blood Pressure, and Atherogenic Lipids in Patients with Metabolic Syndrome. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cmet.2019.11.004

 

7. Kahleova et al. (2014). Eating two larger meals a day (breakfast and lunch) is more effective than six smaller meals in a reduced-energy regimen for patients with type 2 diabetes. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24838678

 

8. Nas et al. (2017). Impact of breakfast skipping compared with dinner skipping on regulation of energy balance and metabolic risk. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28490511

 

9. Obes. (2010). The effects of intermittent or continuous energy restriction on weight loss and metabolic disease risk markers. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3017674/

 

10. Anguah et al. (2020). Changes in Food Cravings and Eating Behavior after a Dietary Carbohydrate Restriction Intervention Trial. https://www.mdpi.com/2072-6643/12/1/52/htm

 

11. Zhang et al. (2019). Unraveling the Regulation of Hepatic Gluconeogenesis. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30733709

 

12. Schönfeld et al. (2017). Brain energy metabolism spurns fatty acids as fuel due to their inherent mitotoxicity and potential capacity to unleash neurodegeneration. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28366720

 

 

13. Gano. (2014). Ketogenic diets, mitochondria, and neurological diseases. https://www.jlr.org/content/55/11/2211.long

 

14. Stafstrom et al. (2012). The ketogenic diet as a treatment paradigm for diverse neurological disorders. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22509165/

 

15. Kverneland et al. (2018). Effect of modified Atkins diet in adults with drug-resistant focal epilepsy. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29901816

 

16. Olsen et al. (2018). The Gut Microbiota Mediates the Anti-Seizure Effects of the Ketogenic Diet. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29804833/

 

17. Mazidi et al. (2019). Lower carbohydrate diets and all-cause and cause-specific mortality: a population-based cohort study and pooling of prospective studies. https://academic.oup.com/eurheartj/article/40/34/2870/5475490

 

18. King et al. (2010). Insulin Sensitivity and Glucose Tolerance Are Altered by Maintenance on a Ketogenic Diet. https://academic.oup.com/endo/article/151/7/3105/2456757

 

19. Goldberg et al. (2020). Ketogenesis activates metabolically protective γδ T cells in visceral adipose tissue. https://www.nature.com/articles/s42255-019-0160-6

 

20. Astbury et al. (2014). Snacks containing whey protein and polydextrose induce a sustained reduction in daily energy intake over 2 wk under free-living conditions. https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article/99/5/1131/4577436

 

21. Cunnane et al. (2017). Tricaprylin Alone Increases Plasma Ketone Response More Than Coconut Oil or Other Medium-Chain Triglycerides. https://academic.oup.com/cdn/article/1/4/e000257/4555134

 

22. Klancic et al. (2020). Gut microbiota and obesity: Impact of antibiotics and prebiotics and potential for musculoskeletal health. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2095254619300511

 

23. Andoh et al. (2016). Comparison of the gut microbial community between obese and lean peoples using 16S gene sequencing in a Japanese population. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4933688/

 

24. Guo et al. (2017). Polyphenol Levels Are Inversely Correlated with Body Weight and Obesity in an Elderly Population after 5 Years of Follow Up. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5452182/

 

25. Zhou (2017). Strategies to promote abundance of Akkermansia muciniphila, an emerging probiotics in the gut. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6223323/

 

26. Bellisle et al. (1997). Meal frequency and energy balance. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9155494

 

27. Kahleova et al. (2014). Eating two larger meals a day (breakfast and lunch) is more effective than six smaller meals in a reduced-energy regimen for patients with type 2 diabetes. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24838678

 

28. Cornell Food & Brand Lab. Let hunger be your guide. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/12/151230043603.htm

 

29. Douglas et al. (2012). Differential effects of dairy snacks on appetite, but not overall energy intake. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22380537

 

30. Kelly et al. (2020). Eating breakfast and avoiding late-evening snacking sustains lipid oxidation. https://journals.plos.org/plosbiology/article?id=10.1371/journal.pbio.3000622

 

31. Joshi et al. (2014). Effect of excessive water intake on body weight, body mass index, body fat, and appetite of overweight female participants. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4121911/

 

32. Reed et al. (2007). Effects of Peppermint Scent on Appetite Control and Caloric Intake. https://www.aeroscena.com/pages/researcch-oils-30

 

33. Ledochowski et al. (2015). Acute Effects of Brisk Walking on Sugary Snack Cravings in Overweight People, Affect and Responses to a Manipulated Stress Situation and to a Sugary Snack Cue. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4356559/

EXERCISE

34. https://www.telegraph.co.uk/health-fitness/body/obesity-loneliness-can-middle-aged-secure-extra-30-years-health/

 

35. Kohman (2011). Voluntary wheel running reverses age-induced changes in hippocampal gene expression. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21857943

 

36. https://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/regular-exercise-changes-brain-improve-memory-thinking-skills-201404097110

 

37. Barrett et al. (2012). Meditation or Exercise for Preventing Acute Respiratory Infection: A Randomized Controlled Trial. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3392293/

 

38. Pizzorno. (2014). Glutathione! https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4684116/

 

39. Carmichael, Duncan. (2018). Younger for Longer: How You Can Slow the Ageing Process and Stay Healthy for Life. London: Little Brown Book Group.

 

40. Kloek et al. (2010). Glutathione prevents the early asthmatic reaction and airway hyperresponsiveness in guinea pigs. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20228417

 

41. Jeevanandam et al. (2000). Altered plasma cytokines and total glutathione levels in parenterally fed critically ill trauma patients with adjuvant recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) therapy. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10708161

 

42. Bauman et al. (2017). Does physical activity moderate the association between alcohol drinking and all-cause, cancer and cardiovascular diseases mortality? https://bjsm.bmj.com/content/51/8/651.short?g=w_bjsm_ahead_tab

 

43. Boor et al. (2009). Regular moderate exercise reduces advanced glycation and ameliorates early diabetic nephropathy in obese Zucker rats. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19608208

 

44. Grgic et al. (2018). Effect of Resistance Training Frequency on Gains in Muscular Strength: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29470825

 

45. Lasevicius et al. (2019). Muscle Failure Promotes Greater Muscle Hypertrophy in Low-Load but Not in High-Load Resistance Training. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31895290

 

46. Brad et al. (2019). Resistance Training Volume Enhances Muscle Hypertrophy but Not Strength in Trained Men https://journals.lww.com/acsm-msse/fulltext/2019/01000/Resistance_training_Volume_Enhances_Muscle.13.aspx

 

47. Alto et al. (2018). Resistance Training Volume Enhances Muscle Hypertrophy but Not Strength in Trained Men. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6303131/

 

48. McKendry et al. (2019). Comparable Rates of Integrated Myofibrillar Protein Synthesis Between Endurance-Trained Master Athletes and Untrained Older Individuals. https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fphys.2019.01084/full

49. Patania et al. (2020). The Psychophysiological Effects of Different Tempo Music on Endurance Versus High-Intensity Performances. https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fpsyg.2020.00074/full

 

50. Dáttilo et al. (2020). Effects of Sleep Deprivation on Acute Skeletal Muscle Recovery after Exercise. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31469710

 

51. Carvalho et al. (2018). Physical Exercise For Parkinson’s Disease: Clinical And Experimental Evidence. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5897963/

 

52. Sosa-Reina et al. (2017). Effectiveness of Therapeutic Exercise in Fibromyalgia Syndrome: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Clinical Trials. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5632473/

 

53. Li et al. (2005). Increased astrocyte proliferation in rats after running exercise. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16024173/

 

54. Fu et al. (2016). Exercise Training Promotes Functional Recovery after Spinal Cord Injury. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5168470/

 

55. Garcia et al. (2019). Types of Sedentary Behavior and Risk of Cardiovascular Events and Mortality in Blacks. https://www.ahajournals.org/doi/full/10.1161/JAHA.118.010406

 

56. Diaz et al. (2019). Potential Effects on Mortality of Replacing Sedentary Time With Short Sedentary Bouts or Physical Activity: A National Cohort Study. https://academic.oup.com/aje/advance-article-abstract/doi/10.1093/aje/kwy271/5245876?redirectedFrom=fulltext

 

57. Madhav et al (2017). Association between screen time and depression among US adults. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5574844/

 

58. Gillen et al. (2016). Twelve Weeks of Sprint Interval Training Improves Indices of Cardiometabolic Health Similar to Traditional Endurance Training despite a Five-Fold Lower Exercise Volume and Time Commitment. https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0154075

 

59. https://static.physoc.org/app/uploads/2019/06/27085900/Future-Physiology-Programme-2019-Web.pdf

 

60. https://www.hilarispublisher.com/open-access/hormonal-and-metabolic-responses-to-high-intensity-interval-training-2161-0673.1000e132.pdf

 

61. https://www.health.harvard.edu/diseases-and-conditions/growth-hormone-athletic-performance-and-aging

 

62. Tucker. (2017). Physical activity and telomere length in U.S. men and women. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0091743517301470

 

63. https://www.fisiologiadelejercicio.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/The-Effect-of-Chronic-Exercise-Training-on-Leptin.pdf

 

64. Viana et al. (2019). Is interval training the magic bullet for fat loss? https://bjsm.bmj.com/content/53/10/655

 

65. Keshel et al. (2015). Exercise Training and Insulin Resistance: A Current Review. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4625541/

 

66. Cassidy et al. (2017). High-intensity interval training: a review of its impact on glucose control and cardiometabolic health. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27681241

 

67. Nes et al. (2013). Age-predicted maximal heart rate in healthy subjects. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22376273

 

68. Kennedy et al. (2015). How does the 'maximum achievable' heart-rate change as cardiovascular fitness increases?https://www.researchgate.net/post/How_does_the_maximum_achievable_heart-rate_change_as_cardiovascular_fitness_increases

 

69. Carey. (2009). Quantifying differences in the "fat burning" zone and the aerobic zone: implications for training. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19855335

 

70. https://www.mountelizabeth.com.sg/healthplus/article/fat-burning-zone-heart-rate-to-lose-fat

 

71. https://westporty.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/12/Stretching-Guidelines1.pdf

 

72. Bandy. (1994). The effect of time on static stretch on the flexibility of the hamstring muscles. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8066111/

 

73. Wiewelhove et al. (2019). A Meta-Analysis of the Effects of Foam Rolling on Performance and Recovery. https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fphys.2019.00376/full

 

74. Capobianco et al. (2019). Self-massage prior to stretching improves flexibility in young and middle-aged adults. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30714484

 

75. Shepherd et al. (2010). Habitual physical activity and health in the elderly: The Nakanojo Study. https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/j.1447-0594.2010.00589.x

 

76. Park et al. (2008). Year-long physical activity and metabolic syndrome in older Japanese adults. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18948564

 

77. Lee et al. (2019). Association of Step Volume and Intensity With All-Cause Mortality in Older Women. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31141585

AVOIDING ALZHEIMER'S

1. Thalhauser et al. (2011). Alzheimer’s disease: rapid and slow progression. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3223623/#RSIF20110134C1

 

2. Lourida et al. (2019). Association of Lifestyle and Genetic Risk With Incidence of Dementia. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31302669

 

3. McGrath et al. (2017). Blood pressure from mid- to late life and risk of incident dementia. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29117954/

 

4. Kivipelto et al. (2005). Obesity and vascular risk factors at midlife and the risk of dementia and Alzheimer disease. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16216938/

 

5. McIntosh et al. (2019). Importance of Treatment Status in Links Between Type 2 Diabetes and Alzheimer’s Disease. https://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/42/5/972

 

6. Kuehn et al. (2020). In Alzheimer Research, Glucose Metabolism Moves to Center Stage. https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/article-abstract/2758712

 

7. Zheng et al, (2018). Hb 1c, diabetes and cognitive decline: the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing. https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00125-017-4541-7

 

8. Owen et al. (2017). The Impact of Diet-Based Glycaemic Response and Glucose Regulation on Cognition: Evidence Across the Lifespan https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28651658

 

9. Daulatzai et al. (2017). Cerebral hypoperfusion and glucose hypometabolism: Key pathophysiological modulators promote neurodegeneration, cognitive impairment, and Alzheimer's disease. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27350397

 

10. Zilberter et al. (2017). The vicious circle of hypometabolism in neurodegenerative diseases: Ways and mechanisms of metabolic correction. https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/jnr.24064

 

11. Anastasiou et al. (2017). Mediterranean diet and cognitive health: Initial results from the Hellenic Longitudinal Investigation of Ageing and Diet. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28763509/

 

12. Bao et al. (2009). Food insulin index: physiologic basis for predicting insulin demand evoked by composite meals. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19710196

 

13. González-Domínguez et al. (2014). Homeostasis of metals in the progression of Alzheimer's disease. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24668390

 

14. Barnard et al. (1992). Regulation of glucose transport in skeletal muscle. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1426762

 

15. Morris et al. (2017). Aerobic exercise for Alzheimer's disease: A randomized controlled pilot trial. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28187125/

 

16. Lamb et al. (2018). Dementia And Physical Activity (DAPA) trial of moderate to high intensity exercise training for people with dementia: randomised controlled trial. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29769247/

 

17. Flynn et al. (2007). The Anti-Inflammatory Actions of Exercise Training. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4243532/

 

18. Chin et al. (2014). Improved Cognitive Performance Following Aerobic Exercise Training in People with Traumatic Brain Injury. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4380661/

 

19. Jourdain et al. (2016). L-Lactate protects neurons against excitotoxicity: implication of an ATP-mediated signaling cascade. https://www.nature.com/articles/srep21250

 

20. Whitfield et al. (2020). Cardiorespiratory Fitness and Gray Matter Volume in the Temporal, Frontal, and Cerebellar Regions in the General Population. https://www.mayoclinicproceedings.org/article/S0025-6196(19)30522-1/fulltext

 

21. Tan et al. (2017). Physical Activity, Brain Volume, and Dementia Risk: The Framingham Study. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27422439/

 

22. Takashi et al. (2019). Exercise Training in Amnestic Mild Cognitive Impairment: A One-Year Randomized Controlled Trial. https://content.iospress.com/articles/journal-of-alzheimers-disease/jad181175

 

23. Nyberg et al. (2014). Cardiovascular and cognitive fitness at age 18 and risk of early-onset dementia. https://academic.oup.com/brain/article/137/5/1514/333397

 

24. Tari et al. (2019). Temporal changes in cardiorespiratory fitness and risk of dementia incidence and mortality. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2468266719301835

 

25. Zhong et al. (2015). Smoking Is Associated with an Increased Risk of Dementia. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4357455/

 

26. Sabia et al. (2018). Alcohol consumption and risk of dementia: 23 year follow-up of Whitehall II cohort studyhttps://www.bmj.com/content/362/bmj.k2927

 

27. Guha et al. (2008). Alteration of brain monoamines & EEG wave pattern in rat model of Alzheimer's disease & protection by Moringa oleifera. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19246799

 

28. http://newsroom.ucla.edu/releases/curcumin-improves-memory-and-mood-new-ucla-study-says.

 

29. Hewlings et al. (2017). Curcumin: A Review of Its’ Effects on Human Health. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5664031/

 

30. Rao et al. (2015). Effect of piperine on liver function of CF-1 albino mice. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26205799

 

31. Ngandu et al. (2015). A 2 year multidomain intervention of diet, exercise, cognitive training, and vascular risk monitoring versus control to prevent cognitive decline in at-risk elderly people. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25771249

 

32. Readhead et al. (2018). Multiscale Analysis of Independent Alzheimer's Cohorts Finds Disruption of Molecular, Genetic, and Clinical Networks by Human Herpesvirus. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29937276

 

33. Itzhaki. (2018). Corroboration of a Major Role for Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 in Alzheimer’s Disease. https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fnagi.2018.00324/full

 

34. Tzeng et al. (2018). Anti-herpetic Medications and Reduced Risk of Dementia in Patients with Herpes Simplex Virus Infections. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29488144

 

35. Itzhaki et al. (2018). Herpes Viruses and Senile Dementia. https://content.iospress.com/articles/journal-of-alzheimers-disease/jad180266

 

36. Itzhaki. (2018). Corroboration of a Major Role for Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 in Alzheimer’s Disease. https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fnagi.2018.00324/full

 

37. Tzeng et al. (2018). Fibromyalgia and Risk of Dementia. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29406043

 

38. Husain. (2018). Cognition and dementia in older patients with epilepsy. https://academic.oup.com/brain/article/141/6/1592/4915830

 

39. Cai et al. (2018). Schizophrenia and risk of dementia: a meta-analysis study. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6095111/

 

40. Asprey, Dave. (2019). Super Human: The Bulletproof Plan to Age Backward and Maybe Even Live Forever (p. 242). HarperCollins Publishers. Kindle Edition.

 

41. Nworu et al. (2013). https://www.researchgate.net/publication/283509069_Extracts_of_Moringa_oleifera_Lam_showing_inhibitory_activity_against_early_steps_in_the_infectivity_of_HIV-1_lentiviral_particles_in_a_viral_vector-based_screening

 

42. Ning et al. (2019). Sleep problems, Alzheimer's disease are linked, but which comes first? https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/03/190322093851.htm

 

43. Benedict et al. (2020). Losing a night of sleep may increase blood levels of Alzheimer's biomarker. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2020/01/200108160342.htm

 

44. Fulz et al. (2019). Coupled electrophysiological, hemodynamic, and cerebrospinal fluid oscillations in human sleep. https://science.sciencemag.org/content/366/6465/628

 

45. Nedergaard et al. (2019). Not all sleep is equal when it comes to cleaning the brain. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/02/190227173111.htm

 

46. Madsen et al. (1991). Cerebral O2 metabolism and cerebral blood flow in humans during deep and rapid-eye-movement sleep. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1885454

 

47. Kim et al. (2015). The Impact of Sleep and Circadian Disturbance on Hormones and Metabolism. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4377487/

 

48. Watson et al. (2017). Chronic sleep deprivation suppresses immune system. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/01/170127113010.htm

 

49. Aggarwal et al. (2020). The skinny on why poor sleep may increase heart risk in women. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2020/02/200217085214.htm

 

50. Cairney et al. (2017). Mechanisms of Memory Retrieval in Slow-Wave Sleep. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28934526

 

51. Scott et al. (2017). Does improving sleep lead to better mental health? https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5623526/

 

52. Ohayon et al. (2004). Meta-analysis of quantitative sleep parameters from childhood to old age in healthy individuals: developing normative sleep values across the human lifespan. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15586779/

 

53. Yiallouris et al. (2019). Adrenal Aging and Its Implications on Stress Responsiveness in Humans. https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fendo.2019.00054/full

 

54. Tähkämö et al. (2019). Systematic review of light exposure impact on human circadian rhythm. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30311830

 

55. Kwok et al. (2018). Self‐Reported Sleep Duration and Quality and Cardiovascular Disease and Mortality. https://www.ahajournals.org/doi/10.1161/JAHA.118.008552

 

56. Walker, Matthew. (2017). Why We Sleep. Penguin Books Ltd. Kindle Edition.

 

57. Faraut et al. (2015). Napping reverses health effects of poor sleep, study finds. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/02/150210141734.htm

 

58. Spadola et al. (2019). Evening intake of alcohol, caffeine, and nicotine: night-to-night associations with sleep duration and continuity among African Americans. https://academic.oup.com/sleep/article/42/11/zsz136/5535848

 

59. Wild et al. (2018). Dissociable effects of self-reported daily sleep duration on high-level cognitive abilities. https://academic.oup.com/sleep/article/41/12/zsy182/5096067

 

60. Zhou et al. (2020). Sleep duration, midday napping, and sleep quality and incident stroke. https://n.neurology.org/content/94/4/e345

 

61. Kwok et al. (2018). Self‐Reported Sleep Duration and Quality and Cardiovascular Disease and Mortality: A Dose‐Response Meta‐Analysis. https://www.ahajournals.org/doi/10.1161/JAHA.118.008552

 

62. Wang et al. (2019). Association of estimated sleep duration and naps with mortality and cardiovascular events. https://academic.oup.com/eurheartj/article-abstract/40/20/1620/5229545?redirectedFrom=fulltext

 

63. Zhou et al. (2020). Sleep duration, midday napping, and sleep quality and incident stroke. https://n.neurology.org/content/94/4/e345

 

64. Richmond et al. (2019). Investigating causal relations between sleep traits and risk of breast cancer in women. https://www.bmj.com/content/365/bmj.l2327

 

65. Walker, Matthew. (2017). Why We Sleep. Penguin Books Ltd. Kindle Edition.

 

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67. Buhr et al. (2019). Neuropsin (OPN5) Mediates Local Light-Dependent Induction of Circadian Clock Genes and Circadian Photoentrainment in Exposed Murine Skin. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0960982219311133?via%3Dihub

 

68. Tähkämö et al. (2019). Systematic review of light exposure impact on human circadian rhythm. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30311830

 

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70. Dolezal et al. (2017). Interrelationship between Sleep and Exercise. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5385214/

 

71. St-Onge et al. (2016). Effects of Diet on Sleep Quality. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5015038/

 

72. https://www.dairyreporter.com/Article/2005/12/12/Cheese-unlocks-your-wildest-dreams-says-study

 

73. Spadola et al. (2019). Evening intake of alcohol, caffeine, and nicotine: night-to-night associations with sleep duration and continuity. https://academic.oup.com/sleep/article/42/11/zsz136/5535848

 

74. Walker, Matthew. (2017). Why We Sleep. Penguin Books Ltd. Kindle Edition.

 

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78. Takeuchi et al. (2016). Effects of the usage of a blacked-out curtain on the sleep-wake rhythm of Japanese University students. https://link.springer.com/article/10.1046/j.1446-9235.2003.00039.x

 

79. Hale et al. (2019). Youth screen media habits and sleep: sleep-friendly screen-behavior recommendations for clinicians, educators, and parents. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5839336/

 

 

80. Chang et al. (2014). Evening use of light-emitting eReaders negatively affects sleep, circadian timing, and next-morning alertness. https://www.pnas.org/content/112/4/1232

 

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82. Valentine et al. (2018). Cognitive Effects of Nicotine: Recent Progress. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29110618

 

83. Gilpin et al. (2019). Queen’s University researchers discover harm caused by e-cigarettes. https://www.belfastlive.co.uk/news/health/queens-university-researchers-discover-harm-17425922

 

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2. Lastella et al. (2019). Sex and Sleep: Perceptions of Sex as a Sleep Promoting Behavior in the General Adult Population. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6409294/

3. Hambach et al. (2017). The impact of sexual activity on idiopathic headaches. https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0333102413476374

 

4. Mayberry et al. (2016). ’Birthgasm’: A Literary Review of Orgasm as an Alternative Mode of Pain Relief in Childbirth. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26578553

 

5. Sprouse-Blum et al. (2018). Understanding Endorphins and Their Importance in Pain Management. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3104618/

 

6. Goodin et al. (2015). Oxytocin – A Multifunctional Analgesic for Chronic Deep Tissue Pain. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4276444/

 

7. https://www.telegraph.co.uk/lifestyle/10161279/Sex-is-the-secret-to-looking-younger-claims-researcher.html

 

8. Kepler et al. (2020). Frequency of Sexual Activity and Long-term Survival after Acute Myocardial Infarction. https://www.amjmed.com/article/S0002-9343(19)30554-6/fulltext

 

9. Frappier et al. (2013). Energy Expenditure during Sexual Activity in Young Healthy Couples. https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0079342

 

10. Lawson. (2017). The effects of oxytocin on eating behaviour and metabolism in humans. https://www.nature.com/articles/nrendo.2017.115

 

11. Reiss et al. (2017). Oxytocin: Potential to mitigate cardiovascular risk. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31112739

 

12. Smith et al. (2017). Sex and death: are they related? Findings from the Caerphilly Cohort Study. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9448525

 

13. (2016). Kaplan-Meier curve for prostate cancer-free survival according to ejaculation frequency. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5040619/figure/F1/

 

14. Francesco et al. (2017). Mediterranean diet and erectile dysfunction. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5510347/

 

15. Gerbild et al. (2018). Physical Activity to Improve Erectile Function. https://www.smoa.jsexmed.org/article/S2050-1161(18)30029-1/fulltext

 

16. Yeo et al. (2018). Which exercise is better for increasing see run testosterone levels in patients with erectile dysfunction? https://wjmh.org/DOIx.php?id=10.5534/wjmh.17030

 

17. Kumagai et al. (2015). Increased physical activity has a greater effect than reduced energy intake on lifestyle modification-induced increases in testosterone. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4706091/

 

18. Hackney et al. (2012). Testosterone responses to intensive interval versus steady-state endurance exercise. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23310924

 

19. Weiss et al. (1983). Comparison of serum testosterone and androstenedione responses to weight lifting in men and women. https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/BF00423247

 

20. Pelvic floor exercises for erectile dysfunction. https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/j.1464-410X.2005.05690.x

 

21. Dorey et al. (2005). Pelvic floor exercises for erectile dysfunction. https://www.physiotherapyjournal.com/article/S0031-9406(19)30007-0/fulltext

 

22. https://www.psychologytoday.com/gb/blog/secrets-longevity/201102/orgasms-health-and-longevity-does-sex-promote-health

 

23. Roher et al. (2013). Cerebral blood flow in Alzheimer’s disease. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3481957/

 

24. https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/all-about-sex/200903/the-most-important-sexual-statistic?page=1

 

25. Kontula. (2016). Determinants of female sexual orgasms. https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.3402/snp.v6.31624

 

26. Brody et al. (2006). Vaginal orgasm is associated with better psychological function. https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/14681990601059669

 

27. Trompeter et al. (2012). Sexual Activity and Satisfaction in Healthy Community-dwelling Older Women. https://www.amjmed.com/article/S0002-9343(11)00655-3/fulltext

 

28. Herbenick et al. (2017). Women's Experiences With Genital Touching, Sexual Pleasure, and Orgasm: Results From a U.S. Probability Sample of Women Ages 18 to 94. https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/0092623X.2017.1346530

 

29. https://abcnews.go.com/Health/ReproductiveHealth/sex-study-female-orgasm-eludes-majority-women/story?id=8485289

 

30. Bischof-Campbell et al. (2019). Body Movement Is Associated With Orgasm During Vaginal Intercourse in Women. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30358427

 

31. https://www.refinery29.com/en-us/2016/02/102745/how-to-have-multiple-orgasms

 

32. https://www.haaretz.com/science-and-health/.premium.MAGAZINE-come-again-multiple-orgasms-and-the-women-who-have-them-1.5475924

 

33. Burri et al. (2019). Masturbatory Behavior in a Population Sample of German Women.

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35. Francesco et al. (2019). The Impact of Metabolic Syndrome and Its Components on Female Sexual Dysfunction. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6504795/

 

36. Esposito et al. (2009). Hyperlipidemia and sexual function in premenopausal women. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19453904

 

37. Esposito et al. (2007). Mediterranean diet improves sexual function in women with the metabolic syndrome. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17673936

 

38. Basson et al. (2010). Testosterone therapy for reduced libido in women. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3474615/

 

39. Weiss et al. (1983). Comparison of serum testosterone and androstenedione responses to weight lifting in men and women. https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/BF00423247

 

40. Lipton et al. (2019). Study Finds Key Brain Region Smaller in Birth Control Pill Users. http://press.rsna.org/timssnet/media/pressreleases/14_pr_target.cfm?ID=2136

 

 

41. Bradshaw et al. (2020). Hormonal contraceptive use predicts decreased perseverance and therefore performance on some simple and challenging cognitive tasks. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0018506X19304593

 

42. Skovlund et al. (2016). Association of Hormonal Contraception With Depression. https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamapsychiatry/fullarticle/2552796

 

43. Raeder et al. (2019). No pills, more skills: The adverse effect of hormonal contraceptive use on exposure therapy benefit. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0022395619308416?via%3Dihub

 

44. Zuurbier et al. (2016). Risk of Cerebral Venous Thrombosis in Obese Women. https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamaneurology/fullarticle/2500277

 

45. Khalili et al. (2016). Association Between Long-term Oral Contraceptive Use and Risk of Crohn’s Disease Complications in a Nationwide Study. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4928680/

 

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2. Liu et al. (2017). Evidence for Inflammation-Associated Depression. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27221622

 

3. Firth et al. (2019). What Is the Role of Dietary Inflammation in Severe Mental Illness? https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31156486

 

4. Gangwisch et al. (2015). High glycemic index diet as a risk factor for depression. https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article/102/2/454/4564524

 

5. Knüppel. (2017). Sugar intake from sweet food and beverages, common mental disorder and depression. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5532289/

 

6. Brietzke et al. (2018). Ketogenic diet as a metabolic therapy for mood disorders: Evidence and developments. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30075165/

 

7. Almond. (2013). Depression and inflammation: Examining the link. https://www.mdedge.com/psychiatry/article/76288/depression/depression-and-inflammation-examining-link

 

8. Riemann et al. (2020). Sleep, insomnia, and depression. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31071719

 

9. Fang et al. (2019). Depression in sleep disturbance: A review on a bidirectional relationship, mechanisms and treatment. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6433686/

 

10. Fung et al. (2019). Intestinal serotonin and fluoxetine exposure modulate bacterial colonization in the gut. https://www.nature.com/articles/s41564-019-0540-4

 

11. Valles-Colomer et al. (2019). The neuroactive potential of the human gut microbiota in quality of life and depressionhttps://www.nature.com/articles/s41564-018-0337-x

 

12. Choi et al. (2019). Assessment of Bidirectional Relationships Between Physical Activity and Depression Among Adults. https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamapsychiatry/article-abstract/2720689

 

13. Yasunaga et al. (2018). Cross-sectional associations of sedentary behaviour and physical activity on depression in Japanese older adults. https://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/8/9/e022282

 

14. Helgadóttir et al. (2015). Physical Activity Patterns of People Affected by Depressive and Anxiety Disorders as Measured by Accelerometers. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4293141/

 

15. Bower et al. (2018). Exercise in the treatment of clinical anxiety in general practice. https://bmchealthservres.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12913-018-3313-5

 

16. Kirsch. (2019). Placebo Effect in the Treatment of Depression and Anxiety. https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fpsyt.2019.00407/full

 

17. Boyle et al. (2017). The Effects of Magnesium Supplementation on Subjective Anxiety and Stress—A Systematic Review. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5452159/

 

18. Deijen et al. (1999). Tyrosine improves cognitive performance and reduces blood pressure in cadets after one week of a combat training course. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10230711

 

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22. Tariq et al. (2011). Vitamin D: a potential role in reducing suicide risk? https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22191178

 

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24. Peters et al. (2020). Hepatic Lipoprotein Export and Remission of Human Type 2 Diabetes after Weight Loss. https://www.cell.com/cell-metabolism/fulltext/S1550-4131(19)30662-X#sec4

 

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28. Cahterjee et al. (2016). Type 2 Diabetes as a Risk Factor for Dementia in Women Compared With Men. https://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/39/2/300

 

29. Giovannucci et al. (2010). Diabetes and Cancer. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2890380/

 

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32. Astorino et al. Glycogen and resistance training. https://www.unm.edu/~lkravitz/Article%20folder/glycogen.html

 

33. Van Proeyen et al. (2010). Training in the fasted state improves glucose tolerance during fat-rich diet. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20837645

 

34. Adams. (2013). The impact of brief high-intensity exercise on blood glucose levels. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3587394/

 

35. Colberg (2009). Postprandial Walking is Better for Lowering the Glycemic Effect of Dinner than Pre-Dinner Exercise in Type 2 Diabetic Individuals. https://www.jamda.com/article/S1525-8610(09)00111-X/abstract

 

36. Thorp et al. (2014). Alternating bouts of sitting and standing attenuate postprandial glucose responses. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24637345

 

37. Skytte et al. (2019). A carbohydrate-reduced high-protein diet improves HbA 1c and liver fat content in weight stable participants with type 2 diabetes. https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00125-019-4956-4

 

38. Lean et al. (2018). Primary care-led weight management for remission of type 2 diabetes. https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(17)33102-1/fulltext

 

39. Wu et al. (2017). Metformin alters the gut microbiome of individuals with treatment-naive type 2 diabetes, contributing to the therapeutic effects of the drug. https://www.nature.com/articles/nm.4345

 

40. Campbell et al. (2017). Metformin reduces all-cause mortality and diseases of ageing independent of its effect on diabetes control. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1568163717301472?via%3Dihub

41. Zhang et al. (2020). Cardiovascular risk following metformin treatment in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31904444

 

42. Yu et al. (2019). The Potential Effect of Metformin on Cancer: An Umbrella Review. https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fendo.2019.00617/full

 

43. Wallach et al. (2020). Updating insights into rosiglitazone and cardiovascular risk through shared data. https://www.bmj.com/content/368/bmj.l7078

 

44. Zhou et al. (2007). Berberine stimulates glucose transport through a mechanism distinct from insulin. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17292731/

 

45. Pandey et al. (2011). Alternative therapies useful in the management of diabetes. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22219583/

 

46. Kumar et al. (2016). Moringa oleifera: A review on nutritive importance and its medicinal application. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2213453016300362

 

47. Anhê et al. (2015). A polyphenol-rich cranberry extract protects from diet-induced obesity, insulin resistance and intestinal inflammation in association with increased Akkermansia spp. population in the gut microbiota of mice. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25080446/

 

48. Conaghan et al. (2015). Impact and therapy of osteoarthritis: the Arthritis Care OA Nation 2012 survey. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24889403/

 

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50. Viatte et al. (2017). Genetics of rheumatoid arthritis susceptibility, severity, and treatment response. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?Db=pubmed&Cmd=ShowDetailView&TermToSearch=28555384

 

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52. Khanna et al. (2017). Managing Rheumatoid Arthritis with Dietary Interventions. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5682732/

 

53. Alwarith J. (2019). Nutrition Interventions in Rheumatoid Arthritis: The Potential Use of Plant-Based Diets. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31552259

 

54. https://www.arthritis.org/health-wellness/healthy-living/nutrition/healthy-eating/mediterranean-diet-for-osteoarthritis

 

55. Thomas et al. (2018). What is the evidence for a role for diet and nutrition in osteoarthritis? https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5905611/

 

56. Conaghan et al. (2015). Impact and therapy of osteoarthritis. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24889403/

 

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62. Mailänder-Sánchez et al. (2012). Potential role of probiotic bacteria in the treatment and prevention of localised candidosis. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21672043

 

63. DeBoer et al. (2019). Acute Sinusitis https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK547701/

 

64.Haywardet al. (2012). Intranasal Corticosteroids in Management of Acute Sinusitishttp://www.annfammed.org/content/10/3/241.full

 

65. Maul et al. (2019). Microcurrent technology for rapid relief of sinus pain. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30667597

 

66. Nair. (2011). Nasal Breathing Exercise and its Effect on Symptoms of Allergic Rhinitis. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3392338/

 

67. Pascal et al. (2018). Microbiome and Allergic Diseases. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6056614/

 

68. Loo et al. (2020). Association between Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Allergic Diseases: To Make a Case for Aeroallergen https://www.karger.com/Article/FullText/503629#ref3

 

69. Shen et al. (2016). Bidirectional Association between Asthma and Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Two Population-Based Retrospective Cohort Studies.https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27093172

 

70. Harper et al. (2018). The Role of Bacteria, Probiotics and Diet in Irritable Bowel Syndrome. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5848117/

 

 

71. Olén et al. (2017). Childhood onset inflammatory bowel disease and risk of cancer: a Swedish nationwide cohort study 1964-2014. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28931512

 

72. Bager et al. (2012). Cesarean section and offspring's risk of inflammatory bowel disease: a national cohort study. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21739532

 

73. Harper et al. (2018). The Role of Bacteria, Probiotics and Diet in Irritable Bowel Syndrome. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5848117/

 

74. Mitre et al. (2018). Association Between Use of Acid-Suppressive Medications and Antibiotics During Infancy and Allergic Diseases in Early Childhoodhttps://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamapediatrics/fullarticle/2676167

 

75. Hong et al. (2014). Unraveling the ties between irritable bowel syndrome and intestinal microbiota. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3949257/

 

76. Meining et al. (1997). H2-receptor antagonists and antacids have an aggravating effect on Helicobacter pylori gastritis in duodenal ulcer patients. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9305482

 

77. Wroblewski et al. (2010). Helicobacter pylori and Gastric Cancer: Factors That Modulate Disease Risk. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2952980/

 

78. Ling et al. (2014). Altered fecal microbiota composition associated with food allergy in infants. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24532064

 

79. Hevia et al. (2016). Allergic Patients with Long-Term Asthma Display Low Levels of Bifidobacterium adolescentis. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26840903

 

80. Monsbakken et al. (2006). Perceived food intolerance in subjects with irritable bowel syndrome - etiology, prevalence and consequences. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16391571/

 

81. Domżał-Magrowska et al. (2016). The prevalence of celiac disease in patients with irritable bowel syndrome and its subtypes. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28053683/

 

82. Altobelli et al. (2017). Low-FODMAP Diet Improves Irritable Bowel Syndrome Symptoms: A Meta-Analysis. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28846594

 

89. Staudacher et al. (2017). The low FODMAP diet: recent advances in understanding its mechanisms and efficacy in IBS. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28592442/

 

84. Guilleminault et al (2017). Diet and Asthma: Is It Time to Adapt Our Message? https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5707699/

 

85. Dai et al. (2013). Probiotics and irritable bowel syndrome. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3785618/

 

86. Lorenzo-Zúñiga et al. (2014). I.31, a new combination of probiotics, improves irritable bowel syndrome-related quality of life. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25024629/

87. Harper et al. (2018). The Role of Bacteria, Probiotics and Diet in Irritable Bowel Syndrome. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5848117/

 

88. Abdel-Gadir et al. (2019). Microbiota therapy acts via a regulatory T cell MyD88/RORγt pathway to suppress food allergy.  https://www.nature.com/articles/s41591-019-0461-z

 

89. Durack et al. (2018). Delayed gut microbiota development in high-risk for asthma infants is temporarily modifiable by Lactobacillus supplementation. https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-018-03157-4

 

90. Wilson et al. (2019). Prebiotics in irritable bowel syndrome and other functional bowel disorders in adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30949662

 

91. Whitten et al. (2020). Western herbal medicines in the treatment of irritable bowel syndrome. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0965229919308775

 

92. Johannesson et al. (2015). Intervention to increase physical activity in irritable bowel syndrome shows long-term positive effects. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4294172/

 

93. Prossegger (2019). Winter Exercise Reduces Allergic Airway Inflammation: A Randomized Controlled Study. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6603979/

DODGE A BULLET

1. Traeger et al. (2014). Pain education to prevent chronic low back pain: a study protocol for a randomised controlled trial. https://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/4/6/e005505

 

2. Gordon et al. (2016). A Systematic Review of the Effects of Exercise and Physical Activity on Non-Specific Chronic Low Back Pain. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4934575/

 

3. Akhtar et al. (2017). Effectiveness of core stabilization exercises and routine exercise therapy in management of pain in chronic non-specific low back pain. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5648929/

 

4. Kim et al. (2015). Effect of an exercise program for posture correction on musculoskeletal pain. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4499985/

 

5. Vickers et al. (2017). Acupuncture for Chronic Pain. https://www.jpain.org/article/S1526-5900(17)30780-0/fulltext

 

6. Dehghan M. (2014). The efficacy of thermotherapy and cryotherapy on pain relief in patients with acute low back pain. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25386469

 

7. Radwan et al. (2015). Effect of different mattress designs on promoting sleep quality, pain reduction, and spinal alignment in adults with or without back pain. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S2352721815001400?via%3Dihub

 

8. Steffens et al. (2016). Prevention of Low Back Pain. http://archinte.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=2481158

9. https://www.hfea.gov.uk/media/2563/hfea-fertility-trends-and-figures-2017-v2.pdf

 

10. Pizinno et al. (2017). Oxidative Stress: Harms and Benefits for Human Health. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5551541/

 

11. Jayasena et al. (2019). Reduced Testicular Steroidogenesis and Increased Semen Oxidative Stress in Male Partners as Novel Markers of Recurrent Miscarriage. https://academic.oup.com/clinchem/article/65/1/161/5607916

 

12. Jensen et al. (2020). Associations of Fish Oil Supplement Use With Testicular Function in Young Men. https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamanetworkopen/fullarticle/2758861

 

13. Mayhoub et al. (2014). Self-Reported Parental Exposure to Pesticide during Pregnancy and Birth Outcomes. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4064975/

 

14. Petit et al. (2010). Impact on fetal growth of prenatal exposure to pesticides due to agricultural activities. https://ehjournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1476-069X-9-71

 

15. Schmid et al. (2007). The effects of male age on sperm DNA damage in healthy non-smokers. https://academic.oup.com/humrep/article/22/1/180/2939186

 

16. Wesselink et al. (2016). Caffeine and caffeinated beverage consumption and fecundability in a preconception cohort. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27112524

 

17. Beal et al. (2017). From sperm to offspring: Assessing the heritable genetic consequences of paternal smoking and potential public health impacts. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1383574217300108

 

18. Bhongade et al. (2014). Effect of psychological stress on fertility hormones and seminal quality in male partners of infertile couples. https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/and.12268

 

19. Spindler et al. (2019). Paternal physical exercise modulates global DNA methylation status in the hippocampus of male rat offspring. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6334599/

 

20. Morgan et al. (2019). Paternal diet impairs F1 and F2 offspring vascular function through sperm and seminal plasma specific mechanisms in mice. https://physoc.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1113/JP278270

 

21. (2019). DNA of sperm taken from testicles of infertile men 'as good as sperm from fertile men’. https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2019-03/eaou-dos031519.php

 

22. (2017). Vitamin D supplements could improve fertility. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/05/170523084302.htm

 

23. Stephenson et al.  (2018). Before the beginning: nutrition and lifestyle in the preconception period and its importance for future health. https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lancet/article/PIIS0140-6736(18)30311-8/fulltext

 

24. Lanza et al. (2011). Regulation of Skeletal Muscle Mitochondrial Function: Genes to Proteins. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3070482/

 

25. Derbyshire et al. (2018). Micronutrient Intakes of British Adults Across Mid-Life. https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fnut.2018.00055/full

 

26. Wesselink et al. (2016). Caffeine and caffeinated beverage consumption and fecundability in a preconception cohort. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27112524

 

27. Liu et al. (2019). aerobic exercise preconception and during pregnancy enhances oxidative capacity in the hindlimb muscles of mice offspring. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5912960/

 

28. Gaeini et al. (2017). Effects of exercise prior or during pregnancy in high fat diet fed mice alter bone gene expression of female offspring. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5405222/

 

29. Coussons-Read et al. (2013). Effects of prenatal stress on pregnancy and human development: mechanisms and pathways. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5052760/

 

30. Kneitel et al. (2018). Effects of Maternal Obstructive Sleep Apnea on Fetal Growth. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6092194/

 

31. Nash et al. (2019). Daily blue-light exposure shortens lifespan and causes brain neurodegeneration in Drosophila. https://www.nature.com/articles/s41514-019-0038-6

 

32. Youn et al. (2009). Effects of 400 nm, 420 nm, and 435.8 nm radiations on cultured human retinal pigment epithelial cells. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S1011134409000025?via%3Dihub

 

33. Gupta et al. (2019). Spectral Evaluation of Eyeglass Blocking Efficiency of Ultraviolet/High-energy Visible Blue Light for Ocular Protection. https://insights.ovid.com/crossref?

 

34. Lawrenson et al. (2017). The effect of blue‐light blocking spectacle lenses on visual performance, macular health and the sleep‐wake cycle: a systematic review of the literature. https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/opo.12406an=00006324-201907000-00008

 

35. Owens et al. (2018). The impact of artificial light at night on nocturnal insects: A review and synthesis. https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/ece3.4557

 

36. Arjmandi et al. (2018). Can Light Emitted from Smartphone Screens and Taking Selfies Cause Premature Aging and Wrinkles? https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6280109/

 

37. https://www.birmingham.ac.uk/news/latest/2018/03/regular-exercise-slows-down-ageing.aspx

 

38. Palmer et al. (1989). Alcohol and the Immune System. https://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/10report/chap04b.pdf

 

39. https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/324432#The-mechanism-that-disrupts-T-cells

 

40. Lazar et al. (2018). Aspects of Gut Microbiota and Immune System Interactions in Infectious Diseases, Immunopathology, and Cancer. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6104162/

 

41. Morey et al. (2016). Current Directions in Stress and Human Immune Function. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4465119/

 

42. Chen et al. (2017). A Novel Prebiotic Blend Product Prevents Irritable Bowel Syndrome in Mice by Improving Gut Microbiota and Modulating Immune Response. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5748791/

 

43. Baatartsogt et al.  (2016). High antiviral effects of hibiscus tea extract on the H5 subtypes of low and highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5059367/

 

44. https://www.theguardian.com/science/2016/apr/26/morning-flu-jabs-could-save-thousands-of-lives-study-suggests

 

45. Haake et al. (2004). Effects of sexual arousal on lymphocyte subset circulation and cytokine production in man. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15316239

 

46. Salonen et al. (1998). Donation of blood is associated with reduced risk of myocardial infarction. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9737556

 

47. Chang et al. (2019). Iron intake, body iron status, and risk of breast cancer. https://bmccancer.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12885-019-5642-0

 

48. Milic et al. (2016). The Role of Iron and Iron Overload in Chronic Liver Disease. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4922827/

 

49. Uche et al. (2013). Lipid profile of regular blood donors. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3663474/

 

50. Yunce et al. (2016). One more health benefit of blood donation: reduces acute-phase reactants, oxidants and increases antioxidant capacity. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27089416

UPGRADE YOURSELF

 

  1. Atan et al. (2019). Poor diet can lead to blindness, case study shows. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/09/190903091437.htm

 

2. Rasmussen et al. (2013). Nutrients for the aging eye. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3693724/

 

4. Scripsema et al. (2015). Lutein, Zeaxanthin, and meso-Zeaxanthin in the Clinical Management of Eye Disease. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4706936/

 

5. Kriegel et al. (2018). The enemy within: Gut bacteria drive autoimmune disease. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/03/180308143102.htm

 

6. Chen et al. (2018). Glaucoma may be an autoimmune disease. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/08/180810091530.htm

 

7. Lu et al. (2016). Human Microbiota and Ophthalmic Disease. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5045141/

 

8. Ramasubramanian (2018). Sunlight exposure reduces myopia in children. https://www.aao.org/editors-choice/sunlight-exposure-reduces-myopia-in-children

 

9. Ong et al. (2018). Physical activity, visual impairment, and eye disease. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6085324/

 

10. Linetsky et al. (2014). UVA light-excited kynurenines oxidize ascorbate and modify lens proteins through the formation of advanced glycation end products. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24798334

 

11. Hedge et al. (2018). Worker Reactions to Electrochromic and Low e Glass Office Windows. https://medwinpublishers.com/EOIJ/EOIJ16000166.pdf

 

12. Yan et al. (2017). Clinical outcomes of small incision lenticule extraction versus femtosecond laser-assisted LASIK for myopia. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5596231/

 

13. Gordeladze et al. (2016). https://www.intechopen.com/books/vitamin-k2-vital-for-health-and-wellbeing/vitamin-k2-and-its-impact-on-tooth-epigenetics

 

14. Shanbhag et al. (2016). Oil pulling for maintaining oral hygiene. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5198813/

 

15. Thamke et al. (2018). Comparison of Bacterial Contamination and Antibacterial Efficacy in Bristles of Charcoal Toothbrushes versus Noncharcoal Toothbrushes. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6104356/

 

16. Hirano et al. (2015). Chewing and attention: a positive effect on sustained attention. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26075234

 

17. Smith et al. (2012). Chewing gum, occupational stress, work performance and wellbeing. An intervention study. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22390954

 

18. Kresge et al. (2015). Chewing gum increases energy expenditure before and after controlled breakfasts. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25794237

 

19. Reed et al. (2007). Effects of Peppermint Scent on Appetite Control and Caloric Intake. https://www.aeroscena.com/pages/researcch-oils-30

 

20. Dodds et al. (2012). The oral health benefits of chewing gum. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23573702

 

21. Mäkinen et al. (2011). Sugar alcohol sweeteners as alternatives to sugar with special consideration of xylitol. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21576989

 

22. Bahador et al. (2012). Effect of xylitol on cariogenic and beneficial oral streptococci. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3434645/

 

23. Kandelman et al. (1987). Clinical results after 12 months from a study of the incidence and progression of dental caries in relation to consumption of chewing-gum containing xylitol in school preventive programs. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3476611/

 

24. Nayak et al. (2014). The effect of xylitol on dental caries and oral flora. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4232036/

 

25. Mäkinen. (2009). An end to crossover designs for studies on the effect of sugar substitutes on caries? https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19648742/

 

26. Pretty et al. (2003). The erosive potential of commercially available mouthrinses on enamel as measured by Quantitative Light-induced Fluorescence (QLF). https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12799115

 

27. Joshipura et al. (2020). Over-the-counter mouthwash use, nitric oxide and hypertension risk. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31709856

 

28. Preshaw et al. (2018). Mouthwash use and risk of diabetes. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30468191

 

29. Tartaglia et al. (2019). Adverse events associated with home use of mouthrinses. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6759706/

 

30. Almas et al. (2005). The effect of tongue scraper on mutans streptococci and lactobacilli in patients with caries and periodontal disease. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16032940

 

31. Quirynen et al. (2004). Impact of tongue cleansers on microbial load and taste. https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.0303-6979.2004.00507.x

 

32. Lindqvist et al. (2014). Avoidance of sun exposure is a risk factor for all-cause mortality. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24697969/

 

33. Matsuoka et al. (1987). Sunscreens suppress cutaneous vitamin D3 synthesis. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3033008

 

34. Luo et al. (2019). Characteristics of Surface Solar Radiation under Different Air Pollution Conditions over Nanjing, China. https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00376-019-9010-4

 

35. D’Orazio et al. (2013). UV Radiation and the Skin. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3709783/

 

36. Geldenhuys et al. (2014). Ultraviolet radiation suppresses obesity and symptoms of metabolic syndrome independently of vitamin D in mice fed a high-fat diet. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25342734/

 

37. Scragg et al. (2019). Association of sun and UV exposure with blood pressure and cardiovascular disease. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30412763

 

38. Ferguson et al. (2019). Exposure to solar ultraviolet radiation limits diet-induced weight gain, increases liver triglycerides and prevents the early signs of cardiovascular disease in mice. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30956026

 

38. Nayak et al. (2020). Adaptive Thermogenesis in Mice Is Enhanced by Opsin 3-Dependent Adipocyte Light Sensing. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31968245

 

39. Nayak et al. (2020). Adaptive Thermogenesis in Mice Is Enhanced by Opsin 3-Dependent Adipocyte Light Sensing. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31968245

 

40. Ondrusova et al. (2018). New discovery may explain winter weight gain. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/01/180110113007.htm

 

41. Phan et al. (2016). Intrinsic Photosensitivity Enhances Motility of T Lymphocytes. https://www.nature.com/articles/srep39479

 

42. Fleury et al. (2016). Sun Exposure and Its Effects on Human Health: Mechanisms through Which Sun Exposure Could Reduce the Risk of Developing Obesity and Cardiometabolic Dysfunction. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5086738/

 

43. Rhee et al. (2013). Is prevention of cancer by sun exposure more than just the effect of vitamin D? https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23237739/

 

44. Gao et al. (2018). Effect of sun exposure on cognitive function among elderly individuals in Northeast China. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6202005/

 

45. Zhu et al. (2018). Sunlight Brightens Learning and Memory. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0092867418306561

 

46. Debamita et al. (2019). Structure and mechanism of pyrimidine–pyrimidone (6-4) photoproduct recognition by the Rad4/XPC nucleotide excision repair complex. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/07/190714103138.htm

 

47. The known health effects of UV. https://www.who.int/uv/faq/uvhealtfac/en/index1.html

 

48. Mead. (2008). Benefits of Sunlight: A Bright Spot for Human Health. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2290997/

 

49. Mutti et al. (2014). Scientists study effects of sunlight to reduce number of nearsighted kids. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/11/141120112348.htm

HEALING

 

1. Bashkatov et al. (2005). Optical properties of human skin, subcutaneous and mucous tissues in the wavelength range from 400 to 2000 nm. https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/0022-3727/38/15/004/meta

 

2. Vatansever et al. (2012). Far infrared radiation (FIR): its biological effects and medical applications. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23833705/

 

3. Tuby et al. (2007). Low-level laser irradiation (LLLI) promotes proliferation of mesenchymal and cardiac stem cells in culture. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17457844

 

4. Hwang et al. (2018). Exclusion zone and heterogeneous water structure at ambient temperature. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5905880/

 

5. Hwang et al. (2017). Effect of Antioxidant Water on the Bioactivities of Cells. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5585622/

 

6. Sharma et al. (2017). https://www.researchgate.net/publication/314165158_QELBYR-Induced_Enhancement_of_Exclusion_Zone_Buildup_and_Seed_Germination

 

7. Shui et al. (2015). Far-infrared therapy for cardiovascular, autoimmune, and other chronic health problems. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4935255/

 

8. Akasaki et al. (2006). Repeated thermal therapy up-regulates endothelial nitric oxide synthase and augments angiogenesis in a mouse model of hindlimb ischemia. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16565566/

 

9. Ise et al. (1987). Effect of far-infrared radiation on forearm skin blood flow. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3675759/

 

10. Ryotokuji et al. (2013). Preliminary results of pinpoint plantar long-wavelength infrared light irradiation on blood glucose, insulin and stress hormones in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24204095/

 

11. Johnstone et al. (2016). Turning On Lights to Stop Neurodegeneration: The Potential of Near Infrared Light Therapy in Alzheimer's and Parkinson's Disease. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26793049/

 

12. Masuda et al. (2005). The effects of repeated thermal therapy for patients with chronic pain. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16088266/

 

13. Jadaud et al. (2012). Low-level laser therapy: a standard of supportive care for cancer therapy-induced oral mucositis in head and neck cancer patients? https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3882349/

 

14. https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/stress-management/in-depth/stress/art-20046037

 

15. Chang et al. (2009). The effect on serotonin and MDA levels in depressed patients with insomnia when far-infrared rays are applied to acupoints. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19885944/

 

16. Mero et al. (2015). Effects of far-infrared sauna bathing on recovery from strength and endurance training sessions in men. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26180741/

 

17. Bjordal et al. (2006). A randomised, placebo controlled trial of low level laser therapy for activated Achilles tendinitis with microdialysis measurement of peritendinous prostaglandin E2 concentrations. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2491942/

 

18. Lee et al. (2013). Evaluation of the efficacy of low-level light therapy using 1072 nm infrared light for the treatment of herpes simplex labialis. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23731454

 

19. Barikbin et al. (2016). Comparison of the effects of 665 nm low level diode Laser Hat versus and a combination of 665 nm and 808nm low level diode Laser Scanner of hair growth in androgenic alopecia. https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/14764172.2017.1326609?journalCode=ijcl20

 

20. Wunsch et al. (2014). A Controlled Trial to Determine the Efficacy of Red and Near-Infrared Light Treatment in Patient Satisfaction, Reduction of Fine Lines, Wrinkles, Skin Roughness, and Intradermal Collagen Density Increase. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3926176/

 

21. Gaida et al. (2003). Low Level Laser Therapy—a conservative approach to the burn scar? https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0305417903003668

 

22. Zhang et al. (2018). A clinical review of phototherapy for psoriasis. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5756569/

 

23. https://mrc.ukri.org/news/browse/scientists-uncover-how-sunlight-on-skin-reduces-eczema-inflammation/

 

24. Barolet et al. (2015). Infrared and Skin: Friend or Foe. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4745411/

 

25. Keil et al. (2015). Being cool: how body temperature influences ageing and longevity. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25832892

 

26. Simonsick et al. (2016). Basal body temperature as a biomarker of healthy aging. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5266228/

 

27. Selfe et al. (2014). The effect of three different (-135°C) whole body cryotherapy exposure durations on elite rugby league players. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24489726

 

28. Stanek et al. (2016). Whole-Body Cryostimulation as an Effective Method of Reducing Oxidative Stress in Healthy Men. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28028984

 

29. Lubkowska et al. (2010). Do sessions of cryostimulation have influence on white blood cell count, level of IL6 and total oxidative and antioxidative status in healthy men? https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19779735

 

30. Lubkowska et al. (2011). The effect of prolonged whole-body cryostimulation treatment with different amounts of sessions on chosen pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines levels in healthy men. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21574854

 

31. Księżopolska-Orłowska et al. (2016). Complex rehabilitation and the clinical condition of working rheumatoid arthritis patients: does cryotherapy always overtop traditional rehabilitation? https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26853597

 

32. Ma et al. (2013). Effects of whole-body cryotherapy in the management of adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22850489

 

33. Giemza et al. (2015). Effect of frequent WBC treatments on the back pain therapy in elderly men. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25133646

 

 

34. Ferreira-Junior et al. (2014). Could whole-body cryotherapy (below −100°C) improve muscle recovery from muscle damage? https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4078193/

 

35. Rymaszewska et al. (2007). Can short-term exposure to extremely low temperatures be used as an adjuvant therapy in the treatment of affective and anxiety disorders? https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18421919

 

36. Miller et al. (2016). Whole-body cryostimulation (cryotherapy) provides benefits for fatigue and functional status in multiple sclerosis patients. A case-control study. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26778452

 

37. Bettoni et al. (2013). Effects of 15 consecutive cryotherapy sessions on the clinical output of fibromyalgic patients.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23636794

 

38. Chevalier et al. (2015). Gut Microbiota Orchestrates Energy Homeostasis during Cold. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26638070/

 

39. Oschman et al. (2015). The effects of grounding (earthing) on inflammation, the immune response, wound healing, and prevention and treatment of chronic inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4378297/

 

40. Ghaly et al. (2004). The biologic effects of grounding the human body during sleep as measured by cortisol levels and subjective reporting of sleep, pain, and stress. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15650465/

 

41. Chevalier et al. (2012). Earthing: health implications of reconnecting the human body to the Earth's surface electrons. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22291721/

 

42. Brown et al. (2010). Pilot study on the effect of grounding on delayed-onset muscle soreness. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20192911/

 

AVOIDING TOXINS

 

1. Gerster et al. (2014). Hazardous substances in frequently used professional cleaning products. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4096065/

 

2. White et al. (2015). Asthma in Health Care Workers. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4524494/

3. Abrams. (2020). Cleaning products and asthma risk: a potentially important public health concern. https://www.cmaj.ca/content/192/7/E164

 

4. Hesselmar et al. (2013). Pacifier Cleaning Practices and Risk of Allergy Development. https://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/131/6/e1829

 

5. Svanes et al. (2018). Women who clean at home or work face increased lung function decline, study finds. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/02/180216084912.htm

 

6. Varraso et al. (2017). Late Breaking Abstract - Occupational exposure to disinfectants and COPD incidence in US nurses. https://erj.ersjournals.com/content/50/suppl_61/OA1774

 

7. Sun et al. (2019). Association of fried food consumption with all cause, cardiovascular, and cancer mortality. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6342269/

 

8. LoPachin et al. (2014). Molecular Mechanisms of Aldehyde Toxicity: A Chemical Perspective. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4106693/

 

9. Anderson et al. (2002). Meat intake and cooking techniques: associations with pancreatic cancer. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12351162

 

10. Prasad et al. (2017). Therapeutic Interventions for Advanced Glycation-End Products and its Receptor- Mediated Cardiovascular Disease. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27719648

 

11. Manful et al. (2019). Dataset on improved nutritional quality and safety of grilled marinated and unmarinated ruminant meat using novel unfiltered beer-based marinades. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31799349

 

12. Manful et al. (2019). Unfiltered beer based marinades reduced exposure to carcinogens and suppressed conjugated fatty acid oxidation in grilled meats. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0956713519306292

 

13. Viegas et al. (2012). Inhibitory effect of antioxidant-rich marinades on the formation of heterocyclic aromatic amines in pan-fried beef. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22642699

 

14. Chen et al. (2015). Determination of advanced glycation endproducts in cooked meat products. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25172699

 

15. Rao et al. (1996). Effect of cooking and storage on lipid oxidation and development of cholesterol oxidation products in water buffalo meat. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22060572

16. Stephen et al. (2010). Effect of different types of heat processing on chemical changes in tuna. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3550962/

 

17. Peng et al. (2017). Effects of cooking method, cooking oil, and food type on aldehyde emissions in cooking oil fumes. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27780622

 

18. Liao et al. (2010). Effect of cooking methods on the formation of heterocyclic aromatic amines in chicken and duck breast. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20374878

 

19. Altınterim. (2012) Anti-Throid Effects of PUFAs (Polyunsaturated Fats) and Herbs. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/268515453_anti-throid_effects_of_pufas_polyunsaturated_fats_and_herbs

 

20. Halvorsen. (2011). Determination of lipid oxidation products in vegetable oils and marine omega-3 supplements. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21691461

 

21. Domínguez et al. (2014). Effect of different cooking methods on lipid oxidation and formation of volatile compounds in foal meat. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24583332

 

22. Khan et al. (2015). Cooking, storage, and reheating effect on the formation of cholesterol oxidation products in processed meat products. https://lipidworld.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12944-015-0091-5

 

23. Galor et al. (2008). Effect of cooking on Brassica vegetables. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/223580598_Effect_of_cooking_on_Brassica_vegetables

 

24. Oliviero et al. (2018). Isothiocyanates from Brassica Vegetables—Effects of Processing, Cooking, Mastication, and Digestion. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6175105/

 

25. Weidenhamer et al. (2017). Cookware made with scrap metal contaminates food. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/01/170123110345.htm

 

26. Sajid et al. (2017). PTFE-coated non-stick cookware and toxicity concerns: a perspective. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28913736

 

27. Sunderland et al. (2019). Climate change and overfishing increase neurotoxicant in marine predators. https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-019-1468-9

 

28. Tchounwou et al. (2003). Environmental exposure to mercury and its toxicopathologic implications for public health. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12740802

 

29. Passos et al. (2008). Human mercury exposure and adverse health effects in the Amazon. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18797727

 

30. Cheng et al. (2011). Mercury biomagnification in the aquaculture pond ecosystem in the Pearl River Delta. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21290120

 

31. Storelli et al. (2000). Fish for human consumption: risk of contamination by mercury. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11271834

 

32. Johnsson et al. (2004). Hair mercury levels versus freshwater fish consumption in household members of Swedish angling societies. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15364592

 

33. Schartup et al. (2019). Climate change and overfishing increase neurotoxicant in marine predators. https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-019-1468-9

 

34. Schaefer et al. (2019). Mercury Exposure, Fish Consumption, and Perceived Risk among Pregnant Women in Coastal Florida. https://www.mdpi.com/1660-4601/16/24/4903

 

35. https://www.health-ni.gov.uk/news/phase-down-plan-amalgam-fillings-published-0

 

36. https://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/health-and-families/health-news/a-mouthful-of-trouble-686047.html

 

37. https://www.ewg.org/research/minority-cord-blood-report

 

38. https://www.niehs.nih.gov/health/topics/agents/sya-bpa/

 

39. Lopardo et al. (2018). Estimation of community-wide exposure to bisphenol A via water fingerprinting. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0160412018322335

 

40. Gerona et al. (2019). BPA: have flawed analytical techniques compromised risk assessments? https://www.thelancet.com/journals/landia/article/PIIS2213-8587(19)30381-X/fulltext

 

41. Sowers. (2020). Bisphenol A Activates an Innate Viral Immune Response Pathway. https://pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/acs.jproteome.9b00548

 

42. Ho et al. (2014). BPA linked to prostate cancer, study shows. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140303211409.htm

 

43. Rochester et al. (2013). Bisphenol A and human health: a review of the literature. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23994667?dopt=Abstract

44. Patisaul et al. (2019). Achieving CLARITY on bisphenol A, brain and behaviour. https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/jne.12730

 

45. Ejaredar et al. (2017). Bisphenol A exposure and children's behavior: A systematic review. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26956939?dopt=Abstract

 

46. Patisaul et al. (2017). Prenatal exposure to BPA at low levels can affect gene expression in developing rat brain. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/10/171031120304.htm

 

47. Witchey et al. (2019). Perinatal bisphenol A (BPA) exposure alters brain oxytocin receptor (OTR) expression in a sex- and region- specific manner. https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0161813X19300555

 

48. Hunt et al. (2003). Bisphenol a exposure causes meiotic aneuploidy in the female mouse. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12676084?dopt=Abstract

 

49. Braniste et al. (2010). Impact of oral bisphenol A at reference doses on intestinal barrier function and sex differences after perinatal exposure in rats. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20018722/

 

50. Stahlhut et al. (2018). Experimental BPA Exposure and Glucose-Stimulated Insulin Response in Adult Men and Women. https://academic.oup.com/jes/article/2/10/1173/5094959

 

51. Rubin et al. (2019). The Case for BPA as an Obesogen: Contributors to the Controversy. https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fendo.2019.00030/full

 

52. Tuduri et al. (2018). Timing of Exposure and Bisphenol-A: Implications for Diabetes Development. https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fendo.2018.00648/full

 

53. Ziv-Gal et al. (2016). Evidence for bisphenol A-induced female infertility. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27417731?dopt=Abstract

 

54. Galloway et al. (2017). An engaged research study to assess the effect of a ‘real-world’ dietary intervention on urinary bisphenol A (BPA) levels in teenagers. https://bmjopen.bmj.com/content/8/2/e018742

 

55. Ferguson et al. (2019). Bisphenol S rapidly depresses heart function through estrogen receptor-β and decreases phospholamban phosphorylation in a sex-dependent manner. https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-019-52350-y

 

56. Horan et al. (2018). Replacement Bisphenols Adversely Affect Mouse Gametogenesis with Consequences for Subsequent Generations. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30220498

 

57. https://www.ewg.org/news-and-analysis/2019/03/cosmetics-safety-us-trails-more-40-nations

 

58. https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/08/22/johnson-johnson-ordered-pay-417m-cancer-lawsuit/

 

59. Cronin et al. (2018). Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer, part I: National cancer statistics. https://acsjournals.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/cncr.31551

 

60. Llanos et al. (2017). Hair product use and breast cancer risk among African American and White women. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28605409/

 

61. Philippat et al. (2013). Prenatal exposure to environmental phenols: concentrations in amniotic fluid and variability in urinary concentrations during pregnancy. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23942273

 

62. Harley et al. (2019). Association of phthalates, parabens and phenols found in personal care products with pubertal timing in girls and boys. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30517665

 

63. Maske et al. (2018). N-butylparaben exposure during perinatal period impairs fertility of the F1 generation female rats. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30218874

 

64. Lindsey, K et al. (2017). Transcriptomic alterations in the brain of painted turtles (Chrysemys picta) developmentally exposed to bisphenol A or ethinyl estradiol. https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/05/170517143612.htm

 

10 POINTS TO REMEMBER

 

1. https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2019-02-24/spain-tops-italy-as-world-s-healthiest-nation-while-u-s-slips

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